All Saints Wicklewood

St-Andrews-&-All-Saints-Church-Wicklewood-slide

St. Andrews & All Saints, Wicklewood

Welcome to All Saints’ Wicklewood with (St Andrew’s Crownthorpe)

The United Benefice of High Oak & Hingham with Scoulton & Woodrising

 

Brief description of the Church:

 

St Andrews and All Saints Church, Wicklewood is a 14th Century slate-roofed, flint and freestone walled building in the Perpendicular style. The south-facing Tower, in the Norman style, houses a single 19th C Bell (in situ, but decommissioned) with an open Archway at the base leading into the Porch and Church entrance.

 

Brief history of the church:

 

In the Doomsday Book, Wicklewood is recorded as having 2 manors with formerly 2 Churches situated on the same site. All Saints belonged to the manor of Ralf Bainard and St Andrews to that of the Earl Warenne. In 1367, both Churches became united to the office of the Almoner of Norwich Priory.

 

Normal pattern of services:

 

St Andrews and All Saints is within the United Benefice of Hingham with High Oak, Scoulton and Wood Rising. Regular worship is shared on alternate Sunday’s at 10am with Morley (St. Botolph and St Peters) and on a broader basis with Deopham and Hackford. Worship comprises Holy Communion and Morning prayer with the occasional Evensong during the Summer months. Normally Wicklewood has a service on the first Sunday of the month.

 

 

 

 


When the church is open:

 

The Church remains open at most times.

 

 

 

 

How to get in when the church is locked

 

When locked, the key holder is Julian Holt (Churchwarden). Contact 01953 603668

 

 

 

 

 

Other sources of information about your church:

Information pamphlets providing more details of the Church Building and its history are available in the Church.

 

 

St Andrews & All Saints Wicklewood is a simple yet quite lovely Medieval church with many interesting architectural features, which cover several periods. The principle features are from the Perpendicular period but there are indications of a much earlier church on these foundations, and the 14th – 15th century work mentioned was probably raised on those earlier foundations. There is also evidence of Victorian restoration and additions to the Vestry and Chancel.

The church has recently undergone repair and restoration work.

The Chapel of Ease associated with this Parish at Crownthorpe St James is now a private residence.

Choir practice takes place on Thursday evenings 7.30pm.

The church is used regularly on Monday & Friday 8am and Sundays 10am and is usually open.